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The Dalai Lama Pokes Fun of Japanese Food, Which ‘Sometimes Looks Like Decoration, Not Real Food’

The Dalai Lama Pokes Fun of Japanese Food, Which ‘Sometimes Looks Like Decoration, Not Real Food’


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During a meeting with American students in India, the Dalai Lama made fun of Japanese cuisine, his cat, and mosquitos

vipflash / Shutterstock.com

Sometimes after a Japanese meal, a person might wish to find a restaurant, the Dalai Lama said.

During a recent audience with students of the American Embassy School in New Delhi, the Dalai Lama covered a range of topics that included his feelings on various pets, and mosquitos, the creatures he felt least appreciated the planet’s riches.

The spiritual leader of Tibet also made fun of Japanese food, which he said “sometimes looks like decoration, not real food.” Case in point: The raindrop cake.

According to notes on the meeting from a New York Times reporter, His Holiness also noted that Japanese food tended to be lighter fare than the cuisines of many countries, and that, at times, “after finishing a Japanese meal, people might understandably feel inclined to go out and find a restaurant.”

For what it’s worth, the Japanese diet has often been linked to the longevity of its citizens. With an estimated 61,568 citizens who are 100 years of age or older, Japan boasts the largest concentration of centenarians, in a population of 12.6 million. The United States, which has about 53,000 centenarians, has a population exceeding 300 million.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Posts Tagged With: famous chefs

A really decadent vegan chocolate cake! This is one we find any excuse to make. Its a lovely light and rich cake smothered in a very silky, chocolaty icing. I think you’re going to love it!!

Nigella Lawson certainly knows her way around a cake and this recipe is based on one from her new book. Thanks Nigella! Jane found it somewhere and is such a fan of sweet things, knew it would be a wonder. It’s one of those recipes that any non-vegan would be amazed to find out had no eggs or dairy in. The texture is wonderful and the icing is a knockout. I don’t always tell people things are vegan anyway. It’s just shining, delicious food. ‘Nuff said!

People like Nigella, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall, Jamie Oliver and Rick Stein really kept me interested in cooking in my mid 20’s. Mum normally had Rick and Nigella’s knocking around the house and Hugh was one of my favs. I remember him cooking things on open fires with antique looking pots dangling off his land rover and belting out ‘Baba O Riley’ by The Who with some proper chops. He seemed to be having a great time and it was infectious. I loved the idea of grabbing a bunch of tomatoes from the green house and popping them straight into a pot. That definitely sounded like the good life.

A lady bought me Jamie’s first book in a hotel I used to work at, she knew I liked cooking and felt that a cheeky chap on a scooter would appeal. I loved Jamie’s energy, skill and passion. He didn’t go down stairs, he slid down bannister’s. He tore stuff up, threw things, chopped things with his bare hands…. His carefree approach triggered something in me, I’d worked in a kitchen that was classically French, with big hats and all. Simple, fresh and tasty food was where it was at and Jamie made it all accessible and fun. That was one of the main things, it was FUN! You didn’t have to take yourself or food seriously and this was surprisingly quite revolutionary. Well done Sir Jamie (it can’t be long now lets face it with the sugar thing and all. ) Just one little question mate. When are you going fully vegan again. Jamie recently talked to Tim Shieff and came straight out and said that the future of food is plant-based. Which was a really bold thing to say for a celeb chef but unfortunately, in his new book, there is not one vegan recipe. Maybe the next one will be charged with plant power. Fingers crossed. I know that he loves vegan food and there are loads of vegan recipes over on Jamie’s site.

I used to try out loads of this crews recipes whenever I wasn’t working, which was quite a bit back then as I was a restaurant manager. Cooking has always been a way for me to unwind and be creative. I remember baking loads of Nigella cakes, there was one chocolate orange cake, oh! and who could forget the chocolate and guiness one. I used to have it routinely for birthdays. I just made some chocolate and stout cupcakes that I think you’ll like….coming soon.

Being a vegan chef now, I get the same feeling of inspiration that I did back in my early 20’s when I discovered the real joy of playing with pots and pans. I can now check out these guy’s recipes and take them in a whole new direction. The world of vegan cooking seems so vibrant and creative at the minute, I feel so lucky to be part of it. It’s also great to see Nigella taking a step into the world of vegan baking. There is an almost unlimited scope for brilliant baking without all that other, unnecessary stuff. All you need is plants!!

I make this Decadent Double Chocolate Cake recipe at least once a week in the kitchen and sometimes opt for a slightly less luxurious icing, a standard chocolate butter cream icing made using plant-based spread goes down very well (see below) and is a reasonable economy style option. The team I work with in the retreat centre get quite excited when they see this on the menu, which cannot be a bad thing (as long as there’s leftovers that is!)

If you try this recipe out, please let us know. We’ll be over the moon to hear that you’re in a happy chocolate place.

The batter is wet here, don’t fret. Use a tight fitting tin and line it well. This will mean that the batter doesn’t sneak through.

Please, please (please), please…..do not open the oven door, no matter how curious you get, when baking. Leave it for 45 minutes before peaking. This cake is a good sinker, the bicarb makes it shoot up, but until its almost baked, will quite happily sag back down making it a bit on the heavy side.

Ovens vary and this batter takes a long time to bake but thats what gives the lovely crust and gooey middle. A winner of a cake combo! It may need another 10 minutes.

Unless its a special occasion, we normally substitute the coconut oil in the cake and icing for vegan sunflower or olive spread. This works well, but lacks the ultimate richness and shine that coco oil gives. We’d recommend treating yourself to a nice big jar of coconut oil. Early Christmas present.

You can see that I also make a version of the cake in a rectangular tin, whatever you’ve got really. A rectangular cake is easier to portion, but in this instance, is much wider than a circular cake tin. This means less time in the oven as the mix is thinner. Go with your cake instincts!

The economy version with a more everyday icing

Have some fun with this one.

Decadent Double Chocolate Cake

The Bits – 1 large cake (10-12 slices)

1½ teaspoons instant coffee powder

300g soft light brown sugar

1½ teaspoons bicarbonate of soda

75g non-dairy spread or solid coconut oil

1½ teaspoons apple cider vinegar or white wine vinegar

150g dark chocolate (finely chopped)

1 tbs edible rose petals or flowers

2 tbs chopped pistachios or almonds

Preheat oven 180oC and pop in a baking tray.

For the icing – Put all of the icing ingredients except the chopped chocolate into a heavy-based saucepan and bring to a gentle boil. Stirring and ensuring all is dissolve. Then turn off the heat and add the chocolate, stir until melted and the icing is glossy. Leave to cool, stirring occasionally.

Line the bottom of a 20cm round springform/ loose bottomed cake tin (you will need a leak proof one, this is a wet batter) with baking parchment.

Place the flour, bicarb, salt, instant coffee, chickpea flour and cocoa in a bowl and mix together.

In a separate bowl, mix together the sugar, hot (not warm) water, non-dairy spread/ coconut oil and vinegar until all has melted and is combined. Stir gradually into the dry ingredients, adding a little liquid at a time, then pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45-55 minutes.

Check after 45 minutes. When done, the cake will be coming away from the edges of the tin and a cake tester will come out clean, apart from a few crumbs. This is a fudgey style cake and you don’t want to overdo it.

Transfer the tin to a wire rack and let the cake cool in its tin.

Give the icing a good stir and check it is nice and thick, yet runny enough to spread on the cake. Pour over the cake and use a spatula to ease the icing to the edges.

Decorate the cake with scattering of pistachios, orange zest and edible flowers if you have them. Leave to stand for 30 minutes for the icing to set before slicing into the cake.

Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

This cake freezes well, without the icing. Wrap the fully cooled cake in a double layer of cling film and a layer of foil. Freeze for up to 3 months. To defrost, unwrap and place on a serving plate at room temperature for 3-4 hours.

Pop some flowers on your cake – you won’t regret it

Foodie Fact

For loads of information and nutritional facts about chocolate, or more specifically, cacao, head over to our previous post. We had an almighty chocolate tasting recently and sampled all the wonders of cacao.


Watch the video: Jack Benny-Mel Blanc


Comments:

  1. Damario

    Yes indeed. It was with me too. Let's discuss this issue. Here or at PM.

  2. Markey

    He did not speak this.

  3. Henwas

    It is class!



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