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What Exactly Is Moo Goo Gai Pan, Anyway?

What Exactly Is Moo Goo Gai Pan, Anyway?


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By this point, we’ve all ordered from Chinese restaurants enough times to know what the major dishes are: sesame chicken, Peking duck, etc. But there are a handful of dishes that, while they’re on just about every Chinese-American restaurant menu, we still aren’t really sure what they are.

Take moo goo gai pan, for example. It’s actually a lot simpler than its name might suggest: It’s typically just sliced or cubed chicken (gai pin in Cantonese) with button mushrooms (mohgu in Cantonese) and a variety of other vegetables, usually including bamboo shoots, snow peas, water chestnuts, and Chinese cabbage. These are all sautéed and tossed in a mild white sauce.

While we’re on the subject, here are a few more Chinese menu items explained:

Chow Mein
Chow mein translates to “fried noodles” in the Taishan dialect of Chinese, and that’s exactly what they are. When you see chow mein on a menu, it usually implies that the dish will consist of noodles, meat (there’s usually one indicated), onions, celery, and occasionally other vegetables, mixed with soy sauce; it’s occasionally synonymous with lo mein. There’s also crispy chow mein, which is primarily composed of fried flat noodles topped with a thick brown sauce. When you’re ordering, ask whether it’s steamed or crispy so you know what you’ll be getting.

Egg Foo Young
Egg foo young is essentially an omelette. When you order egg foo young, you’ll receive a big egg patty with a wide variety of add-ins embedded within. There are almost always onions, but you might also find carrots, bean sprouts, cabbage, water chestnuts, mushrooms, and meat, if you’d like.

Moo Shu
This Chinese-American staple has its origins in Northern China, where a stir-fried dish consisting of sliced pork, scrambled eggs, mushrooms, and daylily buds called mù xũ rōu is still served. In the United States, it’s typically made with pork or chicken, egg, bok choy, wood ear or shiitake mushrooms, and celery, sliced into long strips and sautéed in a slightly peppery sauce. It’s eaten wrapped in thin pancakes along with some hoisin sauce, and is traditionally the only item on the menu served this way — though some menus also offer moo shu vegetables.

Kung Pao
This is a classic Szechuan dish that’s traditionally made with chunks of chicken stir-fried with peanuts, spicy chile peppers, and vegetables that can include scallion, green peppers, and bean sprouts. These are cooked with a sauce that typically includes orange juice, ginger, garlic, chicken broth, and sugar, and garnished with more peanuts. Now if only we knew what General Tso has to do with General Tso's chicken!


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Good Food Channel – Delicious Healthy Food : Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Indian, Italian, etc

BROOKLINE &mdash A knish is one delightfully simple dish. Take dough, add filling, bake or fry, and you have the ultimate handheld comfort food, sold in many Jewish delicatessens. The little rounds enjoyed a heyday in the mid-20th century, when many urban neighborhoods with Jewish immigrants had knish shops.

Nowadays knishes aren&rsquot something passerbys grab every day from their local shop, but there isn&rsquot a bar or bat mitzvah party that doesn&rsquot include them. And if you find yourself in Brookline&rsquos Coolidge Corner, you&rsquoll have three knish-serving delis within minutes of each other. All have distinct approaches that offer a combination of nostalgia and innovation.

A fresh batch of meat knishes at Zaftigs.

A knish is essentially a filled dough pocket &mdash not quite an empanada or a dumpling &mdash with beef or potato inside. But other fillings also work. According to Laura Silver, author of &ldquoKnish: In Search of Jewish Soul Food,&rdquo &ldquoIn its most pure form, it&rsquos a pillow of dough stuffed with mashed potatoes and seasoned with onions,&rdquo she says. &ldquoBut there are many varieties. They can be baked or fried, sweet or savory.&rdquo

Knishes, she says, first appeared in 17th-century Poland and arrived in this country in the 1800s, courtesy of the Jewish immigrants. New York and Boston remain major centers for American knish-craft.

The 88-year-old Rubin&rsquos Kosher Restaurant in Brookline serves knishes that haven&rsquot changed much since it first opened. Allen Gellerman, who has owned the spot for 18 years, spent months in the kitchen with the original owners learning their techniques. Potato, spinach, beef, and sweet potato (two for $5.99) are always available, with specials appearing from time to time. &ldquoI like to keep everything traditional,&rdquo says Gellerman. &ldquoThat&rsquos what&rsquos special about Rubin&rsquos. We stick to original recipes, don&rsquot use preservatives, and everything&rsquos made fresh in-house.&rdquo

Continue reading it below

The salty-tangy-sour-sweet-meaty Reuben sandwich

The magic of the sandwich is in the perfect melding of its makings, and has even inspired some delectable variations.

In addition to customers from the Jewish community in Brookline, Gellerman says that since his restaurant was featured on the Travel Channel, more non-Jewish clientele are coming in to sample knishes. His clientele age used to be &ldquoaround 75,&rdquo he says, but lately he&rsquos been seeing more 35- to 40-year-olds. &ldquoPeople come in and tell stories about their parents eating here,&rdquo he says. &ldquoThey&rsquoll tell me, &lsquoThis is exactly what my mother or my grandmother would serve me.&rsquo They feel like they&rsquore back at home. It&rsquos a great feeling.&rdquo

Zaftigs Delicatessen, a few blocks away, is what owner Bob Shuman describes as a &ldquoJewish diner.&rdquo This menu takes a slightly more modern approach to knishes. The deli, established 18 years ago, offers potato, broccoli-cheddar, and a Reuben knish, with corned beef and sauerkraut (see Cover Story). Flavorful meat knishes are filled with seasoned leftover brisket and pastrami (all two for $6). He sells 500 knishes a week and says he&rsquos planning to install a heated case to sell hot knishes to customers looking for a snack or waiting to be seated.

Bob Shuman, owner of Zaftigs Delicatessen.

Shuman&rsquos creations come from a combination of his mother and grandmother&rsquos recipes, and his own experiences in New York, where he and a chef &ldquojust ate and shopped at every place we could find.&rdquo Shuman admits that the contemporary approach to Jewish food was met with skepticism when Zaftigs opened, but reaching a wide audience has always been his goal. &ldquoJewish cookery is like Italian cookery, where nobody cooks as well as your grandmother or your aunt. Our intent, however, has always been to appeal to the masses.&rdquo

While Zaftigs can be unique, Michael&rsquos Deli is really pushing the knish envelope. Owner Steven Peljovich acquired Michael&rsquos in 2012 and began introducing three weekly &ldquoKrazy Knishes.&rdquo While maintaining the staple flavors of potato, spinach, beef, and a diabolically good pastrami knish, Peljovich relies on customer suggestions &mdash especially on Twitter @Michaels_Deli &mdash for unorthodox ideas. Barbecued chicken, three-bean nacho, and roast beef with kimchi were recently available (all $3.75 each).

&ldquoI&rsquove been in the restaurant industry for more than 20 years,&rdquo Peljovich says. &ldquoIt can get boring if you&rsquore doing the same thing every day. This started as a way to let my staff and guests get creative and have fun with food.&rdquo

Of course, when you&rsquove served unusual takes on knishes (including Fluffernutter, Twix, and falafel, which Peljovich said was his only complete failure), there will be naysayers. But the owner isn&rsquot phased. &ldquoWith the Krazy Knishes, people say, &lsquoWait a minute, you can&rsquot call that a knish,&rsquo &rdquo he says. &ldquoI tell them, I don&rsquot know what else to call it, so I&rsquom calling it a knish. A knish is yummy food wrapped in dough and portable for travel. That&rsquos what this is.&rdquo

The immigrants who brought the knish to America probably didn&rsquot foresee their descendants filling the dough with kimchi beef or Twix. But, as Silver, the author, says, &ldquoWhat&rsquos most important are the intentions. If you&rsquore intending to make a knish, that&rsquos what matters.

&ldquoIt must taste good, and be filled with love and stories. If it doesn&rsquot taste good, it doesn&rsquot count.&rdquo


Watch the video: Moo goo gai pan 蘑菇雞片


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