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The Role of Japanese Cooperatives Post Fukushima

The Role of Japanese Cooperatives Post Fukushima


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Cooperatives are the mainstay of Japan’s rural economy through their presence in agriculture, fisheries, and even forestry. Every rural village has a co-op store, access to co-op financing and co-op insurance. In the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear disaster, Japanese cooperatives have played a key role in empowering small groups by embracing social responsibility in times of public fear.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


The community power movement is on the rise in Japan

This article was published in The Beam #4 — Subscribe now for more on the topic.

The 1st World Community Power Conference was held in Fukushima City last November, the year of the fifth commemoration of the Fukushima disaster and one year after the Paris Climate Agreement. More than 600 people from over 30 countries participated in the conference and discussed the role that community power has to play in the global shift towards 100% renewable energy. The participants agreed to the “Fukushima Community Power Declaration”, a declaration expected to become the starting point for a global community power reflection.

Let us look at what history has taught us in order to envisage the future of community based renewable energy.

What does Community Power mean?

Community Power is characterized by local ownership, decision making and distribution of economic and social benefit. In other words, Community Power ensures that local communities have democratic control of renewable energy installations during the planning, installation and operation period, as well as profit from the majority of the economic and social benefits.

Where does it come from?

The origin of the Community Power comes from the Danes. After the oil crisis in the early 1970’s, the Danish wind power pioneers started to arrange collective ownership models with neighbours to establish wind turbine cooperatives. Backed with the strong Danish cooperative tradition and tangible benefit of wind, the community-owned wind turbines saw positive response from the population. In the early 2000s, 150,000 households were co-owners of a local wind turbines. Germany followed a similar pathway with the combination of Feed-in-Tariff and energy cooperatives. Driven by both the anti-nuclear movements, and because of the geographical proximity to Denmark, some citizen groups started to organize wind power cooperatives in northern areas in the ’90s. The Renewable Energy Act (EEG) then enabled the stable growth of citizens’ collectively owned renewable energy systems including wind and solar. From four in 2007, the number of solar PV cooperative jumped to 600 in 2012.

Community Power Movement in Japan

Inspired by movements developed in Denmark and Germany, community power projects started to appear in Japan in the early 2000s, especially after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.


Watch the video: CO-OPERATIVE MOVEMENT IN JAPAN ll FOREIGN CO-OPERATION


Comments:

  1. Guifford

    Wacker, it seems to me a remarkable idea

  2. Conor

    I would like to talk to you on this theme.

  3. Arcas

    Granted, this will have a different idea just by the way

  4. Teodoro

    it is possible to close a space?

  5. Dishakar

    Sorry, I moved this sentence away

  6. Gervaso

    What a lovely idea



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